The engine had been restored in 1988, but when it came to Utah it started many fires! So it was converted to burn oil and returned in 1990 and this time started no fires. Except in the harts and minds of rail fans.

Union Pacific Challenger No. 3985 was designed by Union Pacific and built in 1943 by the American Locomotive Company and was one of 105 Challengers built for Union Pacific between 1936 and 1943 and is the only operating engine of its class in the world today – the largest and most powerful operating steam locomotive.

No. 3985 last operated in "regular" train service in 1957. It was retired in 1962 and stored in the roundhouse in Cheyenne, Wyoming, until 1975 when it was placed on display near the Cheyenne depot. A group of Union Pacific employees volunteered their services to restore the locomotive to running condition in 1981.

The name Challenger was given to steam locomotives with a 4-6-6-4 wheel arrangement. This means that they have four wheels in the leading "pilot" truck, which helps guide the locomotive into curves; two sets of six "driving" wheels, and finally, four "trailing" wheels, which support the rear of the engine and its massive firebox. Each set of driving wheels has its own steam cylinder. In essence, the result is two engines under one boiler.

Shot in standard definition video, screen size 4:3

Copyright 1990

Madame Woo Video

Return of the UP Challenger was shot in 1990 as the UP ran trips through the Wasatch Mountains to Cash Valley.

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